Rhett’s Beginning Beekeeping Tips #2

We’re continuing on in our series of tips for beginning beekeepers. In the first article, my tip for would-be beekeepers was to study like crazy before ever spending a dime on equipment or bees. I believe this is the first, most important tip for anyone interested in keeping bees.

Yet, after all I emphasized in the first article about studying bees, I must now let you in on a dirty little secret: Bees don’t read the books to know how they’re supposed to act! Sooner or later, your bees are going to do something totally unexpected, even if you’ve done everything the book says. When that happens, you’re going to need some help and advice. So that leads us to the next tip:

Tip #2: FIND A MENTOR!

You can memorize all the books I previously listed and watch every video on Youtube, but you need someone with experience to help guide you through and be there to answer questions during those times the bees (or hive pests) are doing something you can’t remember reading about in the books. Even with all the reading and Youtube watching I did before getting my bees, I’ve still asked countless questions of my mentor, Bobby Colson of B & G Honey Farm.

If you can, I suggest finding someone local with many years, even decades, of experience keeping bees. For as the Bible says,

Bobby Colson, teaching a bee class.

Bobby Colson, teaching a class.

“Wisdom is with the aged, and understanding in length of days.” Job 12:12.

You’ll be amazed at all the helpful advice you will receive from an experienced mentor. If you run into a problem, chances are he may have dealt with it countless times before. He’ll teach you little tricks and techniques he’s picked up over the years.

If you can find one who also sells equipment and bees, then so much the better. When you stop by to purchase equipment or supplies, you can talk shop for a bit and learn even more. He benefits from your patronage, you benefit from his experience. It’s a win-win.

One of the things that’s really difficult to learn from books is botanical information on what plants are growing and when the nectar is flowing for your specific geographical area. This is one big reason to find a local mentor. He can help you in this area more than anyone else. Admittedly, this area of beekeeping is probably where I’m the most ignorant.

As far as where to find a mentor, I’d say the best place to start would be at a local bee club or association if there is one in your area. There you can meet beekeepers, listen to discussions, and ask questions. If you don’t have a local club or cannot locate one, look for signs advertising local honey and then try to track down the source. Beekeepers are often willing to help newcomers, but if not, keep looking.

Be friendly and do your homework so you’re prospective mentor can tell you’ve really been trying to learn all you can. Maybe see if they would like some help in the bee yard sometime. You could learn lots just by watching them work.

That’s it for the 2nd installment in this series. As always, if you have any questions or feedback, feel free to leave a comment.

Rhett Kelley

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